SHIFT YOUR FOCUS UP TO “A New View of MS”
For US Audiences Only

MS is different
for everyone

Multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms can vary in type and severity from one person to the next. They can even change in the same person over time.

Multiple sclerosis (MS) symptoms can vary in type and severity from one person to the next. They can even change in the same person over time.

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Common physical symptoms of MS:

  • Fatigue (occurs in about 80% of people with MS)
  • Trouble walking and loss of balance
  • Blurred vision, poor contrast, and trouble seeing colors
  • Numbness and tingling (face, feet, and legs)
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Cognitive changes caused by MS may include:

  • Worsening of memory (affecting the ability to learn and remember information)
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Challenges with planning
  • Trouble thinking of the right word
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Relapses are part of MS

In MS, when a new symptom occurs, or an old symptom returns or worsens, it’s called a “relapse.” People also refer to relapses as:

  • Attacks
  • Flare-ups
  • An exacerbation
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Relapses come and go

There are several different types of MS, but most people with the disease (over 85%) have relapsing-remitting MS, or RRMS. With this type of MS, people experience clearly defined relapses followed by periods of partial or complete recovery (called remission). During remission, some symptoms may fade or go away completely. But that does not mean that your MS has gone away.

Focus on the brain—where lesions and relapses start

Your brain plays a big role in MS, and there are ways to keep your brain healthy that can impact MS symptoms and relapses.